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GMAT

Manhattan Review GMAT Prep is into its eleventh year of helping students achieve high GMAT scores and get into top MBA programs. Now, more than ever, GMAT score is essential to the strength of a business school application. With an MBA degree from top schools becoming ever more in demand, and thus the MBA application processes becoming ever more competitive, students are always looking for a way to make their application stand out. A high GMAT score is instrumental for any student who wishes to be accepted to a top MBA program. With a decade of experience, more than any other comparable GMAT prep company, Manhattan Review is continuing to educate students on how to get the top scores necessary to get into the top schools.

The story of Manhattan Review began in an Ivy-League MBA classroom in summer 1999. Dr. Joern Meissner, while teaching at Columbia Business School, heard from his students that they and their friends were frustrated with conventional GMAT preparation options. In response, he started to create original lectures that focused on presenting the GMAT content in a coherent and concise manner. Dr. Meissner then shared his new approach with students preparing for the GMAT, and it proved immediately popular. Based on these methods, the company Manhattan Review was created with the purpose of providing higher quality GMAT preparation.

Throughout Manhattan Review’s history, the GMAT has changed in many ways. Since the development of those original lectures, the team at Manhattan Review has expanded and adapted its teaching methods to reflect the changes in the test. Students who are retaking the GMAT after a few years need to be aware of the ways in which the test differs from when they originally took it. And any student preparing to take the GMAT needs up-to-date information on the test and the ways it has been modified.

“Over the last ten years,” said Manhattan Review’s founder, Dr. Joern Meissner, “we’ve seen the GMAT becomes more important to the MBA admissions process. We’re proud of the work we’ve done, and we look forward to providing help to students in need of GMAT preparation for many years to come.” She added, “This milestone of being a premier GMAT provider for a decade gives us a chance to reflect on the current landscape of highly selective programs.”

Meantime, students are increasingly seeking the knowledge and support offered by Manhattan Review MBA admissions consultants to gain acceptance into the top business schools around the world. A combination of former admissions committee member experience, insightful advice and customized service distinguishes Manhattan Review’s admissions consulting services. Manhattan Review’s various MBA admissions consulting services are designed to cater to the needs of GMAT students seeking an additional edge in the MBA application and admissions process.

Posted on January 23, 2010 by Manhattan Review

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Manhattan Review has responded to the ongoing recession by lowering the price of its Multi-Week Long GMAT Courses held in New York and Live Online.  For a limited time in 2010 starting from January 16th, a discount is being extended to students who join the Manhattan Review New York GMAT Long Courses and Online Live GMAT Courses. Normally priced at $1399, the New York GMAT Long Courses are now available for $1099. Normally priced at $1025, the Live Online GMAT Courses are now available for $899.

“We understand that current economic conditions have put a strain on the budget of many students,” said Dr. Joern Meissner, the founder and academic director. “But Manhattan Review is committed to preparing students for the GMAT and helping them reach their target score.”

If students pay two weeks in advance for the New York GMAT Long Courses, they are also eligible for an early-bird discount of $999 for a full 28-hour in-person course. The students will also have the option to reinforce their learning with a different instructor in a live online course, bringing the total hours of instruction to 56 hours or more.

Students not located in the New York City area should also check out Manhattan Review’s new discounted price for its Interactive Online GMAT Courses. Normally priced at $1025, the Live Online GMAT Long Courses are now available for $899. If students pay two weeks in advance for Online GMAT courses, they are also eligible for an early-bird promotional discount of $845. It also comes with unlimited access to Manhattan Review’s popular online live recording library of over 100 hours, bringing the total hours of instruction to 128 hours.

Though the price of the course has been lowered by as much as 30%, the Manhattan Review GMAT course content remains unchanged. Students will still receive four Manhattan Review Turbocharge Your GMAT study Guides, as well as the three GMAT Official Guides. Purchase of the course also includes five online full-length Computer Adaptive Tests that simulate the GMAT on a home computer and help students gauge how their score is coming along as they progress through the course.

All Manhattan Review GMAT courses include the following services:

*Better Score Guarantee: Unlimited class hours and advice*
*Double Class for 56+ hours; US$200 Student Referral*
1-2 dedicated GMAT Math and GMAT Verbal instructors for the entire course
Full set proprietary GMAT course materials (Turbocharge Your GMAT)
Real Official Guide GMAT questions (3 books included)
Five on-line challenging GMAT practice tests (CATs)
After-class GMAT Home Study Guideline, Email Support, BlogForum
8-Hour MBA Admissions Online Boot Camp
Student Discount for GMAT TutoringMBA Admissions Help

Find out more – Syllabi, Schedule, Venues, Teaching Video!


Posted on January 16, 2010 by Manhattan Review

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There appears to be a drop in interest from overseas applicants to U.S. MBA programs, according to Kumar Anand of the Economic Times in an article titled: “Number of Applicants for Executive Management in Indian B-Schools Rises.”

Anand cites the example of Jorawar Singh, an Indian young professional seeking an MBA degree inside India and not the likes of Boston and Ohio B-Scools.  This is unusual for many Indian MBA applicants, as well as applicants from other countries, too, as U.S. schools are typically the most sought after in terms of admission.  Anand writes: “In all, 42% of the full-time MBA programs in the U.S. reported a decline in the number of foreign applicants.  Of these, as many as 70% reported the largest decrease in number of applications from India.”

Jorawar Singh, the young professional Anand cites, feels a one-year B-School in India will help him get a job after graduation in India, as opposed to going overseas and then returning to look for work.  Singh contributes, by saying: “Today, quite a few Indian B-Schools are offering quality executive management program at much cheaper cost.”  Anand adds to this, saying that a number of Indian MBA applicants favor Indian B-Schools over U.S. B-Schools because the quality of education is much higher in India than is used to be, not to mention the cheaper cost.

Dave Wilson, president and CEO of GMAC (Graduate Management Admission Council) claims:

“More Indians prefer Indian B-Schools over B-Schools in the U.S.  Of late, India has been offering world-class management education.  Less expensive quality education provided by Indian B-Schools remains a big draw for Indian students.   People are interested in pursuing MBAs from the geography where they could continue working, and India has emerged as a preferred destination for many.”

Curious to know the facts supporting these statements?  Anand claims that a total of 17,488 applications were submitted to Indian B-Schools in 2008.  That number is five times higher than seen in 2004, according to the GMAC.  At the moment, 24 Indian B-Schools accept GMAT scores for 53 programs.

Posted on December 21, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Recently Manhattan Review has had a number of raffle drawings in Germany. We are pleased to announce three of our recent raffle winners: Cordelia Neumetzger, Christian Mankiewitz, and Lena Haubold!

Cordelia Neumetzger entered our raffle at our MBA Gate event in Frankfurt. Christian Mankiewitz and Lena Haubold entered our raffle at the QS World MBA tour in Berlin and Munich. All three won a free in-person GMAT course! Included in the prize are the following benefits included in our course tuition:

  • Better Score Guarantee – Unlimited Classes, Online Library & Advice
  • Turbocharge Your GMAT Math/Verbal Study and Solutions Guides
  • Extensive Quant and Vocabulary Glossaries
  • Three on-line challenging Computer Adaptive Tests
  • After-class Home Study Guideline provided
  • Discount for Private Tutoring & MBA Admissions Services
  • Discounted Access to Online Recording Library for tailored study
  • US$200 Student Referral; US$1000 Corporate Account Referral (applicable only for paying students)
  • Double Your In-Person Class Hours with an Online Course at No Additional Cost (up to 56 Hours of Total Real-time Instruction Hours)

Thanks to everyone who entered our drawings!

Posted on December 4, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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According to a recent article in Business Week titled: “GMAT: The MBA Job Seeker’s Best Friend” – it appears that many schools are encouraging students to take the GMAT time and time again.  A very eye-opening article by Anne VanderMey, it seems the GMAT is not only important for MBA admittance, but also for job recruiting after graduation.

According to VanderMey, with companies being flooded with resumes due to the recent economic recession, it appears recruiters are using GMAT scores to weed out applicants.  This is unusual, as never before has the GMAT taken on such added weight, but it appears for some companies, your score could very well be the factor that gets you an actual interview.

Due to this, professors and career services directors are encouraging students to retake the GMAT time and time again thanks to the tough recruiting climate.  VanderMey profiles several schools that are taking this advice seriously and putting it into practice:

  • University of Texas’s McCombs School of Business: Stacey Rudnick, director of MBA services is advising recent admits with mediocre GMAT scores to consider retaking the test if they think they can score higher.
  • University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business: Mendoza sent a letter to its 2011 class reminding students of the importance of the GMAT when applying to prestigious firms.  The school has offered a four-day crash course for students who wish to retake the test.  Mendoza’s director of MBA career development claims: “We see a large number of consulting companies, some investment banks and a couple of corporations all looking at both GMAT and undergrad MBA GPAs.  These companies are looking for a sustained record of academic excellence.”
  • Thunderbird School of Global Management: Kip Harrel, president of the MBA Career Services Council, claims that students’ average GMAT score is a primary factor in deciding where companies choose to recruit.
  • Darden School of Business: Jack Oakes, director of career services, claims that he sometimes advises candidates with scores in the mid-600s to retake the test if they are looking to land top-shelf consulting or banking positions.
  • Goizueta Business School: Wendy Tsung, executive director of MBA career services, states: “Because the economy is so bad, and there’s so many people applying for positions, companies are looking for different ways to reduce the number of resumes that they go through.  Of the reasons to throw out an application – GPA, undergraduate institution, years of work experience – the GMAT is an ‘easy one.’”

As suspected, a person’s quantitative GMAT score does seem to be linked to salary while some GMAT scores appear to be linked to managerial status. However, VanderMey informs us that not every company considers GMAT scores to be important when considering new hires.  At the University of Connecticut’s School of Business, for example, the executive director was never even asked for GMAT scores from its student body.

It appears, however, that a high GMAT score simply helps you get your foot in the door for the actual interview.  A high score, in general, won’t get you the job of your dreams, but it will get you into speaking with someone face-to-face.  VanderMey quotes Mareza Larizadeh, the founder of Doostang, a career networking site popular with MBA students: “The GMAT isn’t going to get you in.  But it’s something that can prevent you from getting in the door.”

While it seems the GMAT is becoming important for more than just MBA admittance, VanderMey concludes (along with the above schools) that ultimately, the personal elements of the job search – interviews and references, primarily, will always be more important than test scores.

Posted on November 28, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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According to the recent GMAC London Summit on September 17th, students who study for the GMAT well in advance do better on the test than those who don’t.

Dr. Lawrence Rudner presented an enlightening seminar on the GMAT, presenting research that shows an interesting statistic: the older you are, the worse you perform on the exam.  The “peak” of a GMAT test-taker appears to be at the age of 27 or 28, and older people tend not to take as much test prep and score, on average, 30 points lower.

What are some other interesting facts according to the GMAC seminar in London?

•    the GMAT is testing math skills at a 10th grade level
•    geographic trends are the reason for declining percentiles with a large increase in the average quantitative score but not much change in the verbal
•    there are more than 50% non-U.S. GMAT test takers
•    students receive a fixed number of data sufficiency, reading comprehension, critical reasoning, problem solving and sentence correction questions

Want a piece of important advice from the test owner of the GMATIt’s better to guess than omit questions, as there is a severe penalty for not completing the test.

Posted on October 5, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Is the GMAT on a slow decline due to some heated competition from the GRE? There have been rumors floating around for several years now that the GMAT is declining in importance, not only because of a GRE alternative but also because it doesn’t focus on finance, accounting or business strategy. Could this be true? Let’s look at the facts.

Over 1,800 graduate business schools accept the GMAT and as a whole, it’s been the standard admissions tests for business schools for the past fifty years. The GRE, on the other hand, is taken by more than 600,000 students annually and it’s good for a five-year period. Let’s not forget cost: the GMAT costs $250.00 and the GRE significantly lower at a mere $150.00 (for the US only & effectively as of July 1, 2009).

Now, when compared back to back, the GMAT is the harder exam in terms of both the reading and math sections. For native English speakers, the GRE’s reading is slightly easier, although it could be cause for alarm for non-native English speakers due to the complexity of the vocabulary. As a whole, the GMAT is used for business schools and some economic schools while the GRE is used for more general graduate degree programs.

So with all this information laid out, one can’t help but wonder – where did the controversy come from?

ETS actually lost the rights to the GMAT in 2006, so since then they’ve encouraged schools to take the GRE instead. About 115 schools have complied, including Stanford, Johns Hopkins and MIT. The GRE seems to have added bonuses that the GMAT doesn’t. In fact, there is a new section on the GRE called the Personal Potential Index, where a mentor can fill out sections in regards to creativity, integrity and communication. Is the general consensus among graduate school professionals that the GRE is stamping out the GMAT?

Evidently not, according to David A. Wilson, head of the Graduate Management Admissions Council, who was quoted in a recent New York Times article on the topic. “Schools turn to the GMAT because it is a valid, trusted and robust assessment. One way to think about it is that you don’t want your dentist to buy drill bits at Home Depot.”

Where does that leave us on the subject? Our general advice is the following: know what schools you want to apply to before you go about preparing for standardized tests. Know which tests your universities prefer. Keep in mind, the MBA is still accepted by all major business and economic schools around the world. If you know you want an MBA, brush up on the GMAT. However, if you are leaning more towards a general graduate degree, the GRE is probably your best bet.

To read more on the detailed comparison between two tests, please subscribe to our free Manhattan Review email newsletter and read our GMAT vs GRE Part I and GMAT vs GRE Part II newsletters.

Posted on September 18, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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This week we’d like to share some emails we’ve received from students in the UK!

Hi Henry,

I did a weekend crash course with Manhattan Review in London, and found the rigorous practice we did in class very helpful in exposing each of our weaker points. Our tutor gave us lots of useful advice about techniques for tackling specific question types and noting common cognitive errors which would have been much more difficult to gather from studying alone. I also took some private tuition with the crash course tutor, who helped me with areas that I particularly needed to focus on. The tutor gave frank feedback about my weak areas whilst at the same time offering encouragement and showing a good sense of humour. The Manhattan team were also willing to accommodate my availability and quick to respond to requests. I got 720 in the GMAT – many thanks to Manhattan for all their support!

All the best,

Diana Carter

Hello Henry, or as people say around these parts, ‘Howdy’!,

I am e-mailing you in between marketing and accounting classes at the McCombs Business School (University of Texas at Austin), so you could definitely say that I have progressed in terms of my MBA plans!
I took the MR crash course with David Chambers as my instructor. I found David’s tuition to be first-class; and this definitely helped me get a good score first time (710, 5.5AWA) in the GMAT exam that I took about a month after the course.
I was accepted into the University of Texas on a Nippon Foundation Scholarship. I resigned from my job and I haven’t looked back since!

Regards,

Daniel Harrison

Posted on July 6, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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The United States is home to many of the world’s top MBA programs and has a vast array of schools and program choices. Many of its schools provide opportunities not only in the United States but also globally.  In addition, international students are welcome applicants in US schools. They contribute to student body diversity, bring professional experience from outside the US and, very importantly, provide different perspectives to students and faculty, broadening the horizons of all.

Though business schools in the United States traditionally offer 2-year full-time MBA programs, encouraging an internship between the first and second years, MBA programs in the US have expanded in recent years to include 1-year programs, distance learning programs and online, part-time MBA programs. In addition, some programs offer students the exciting opportunity to study in Asia, Europe and the United States. Plentiful options also exist for the experienced professional seeking Executive MBA training.

That said, international applicants sometimes find attending US schools to be tricky, requiring a lot of advanced preparation— especially in the post-September 11th and post-financial crisis environment.

Researching Schools

A great method to find out detailed information about American and European business schools is to attend different MBA tours, which hold forums all over the world to connect interested applicants with business school admissions staff.

Assessing Language Challenges

Some students may find that getting used to life in the US is challenging. Academic, language, or personal adjustments can be difficult, so be sure to give yourself a chance to adjust—for most of us, these things just take time.

Classroom time, for example, is packed with discussion, debate, projects, and student presentations.  International students will want to familiarize themselves with teaching styles prevalent in the US and be sure that they are comfortable with them, or at the least open to them before school begins.

In addition, for non-native English speakers who lack experience in English-speaking classrooms and professional environments, language difficulties may be an obstacle. As part of your b-school application, non-native English speakers will be required to take the TOEFL exam, an English proficiency test. This test requires study and rigorous preparation for many applicants. Score requirements vary according to school, but most schools do provide clear guidelines on what score is acceptable. After completing the TOEFL, the best way to meet the challenge of entering a program in English is to practice and prepare.

Take English as a Second Language classes, sometimes offered during the summer at particular business schools, or a Business English course, if a student’s vocabulary and business language is more problematic. However, keep in mind that with foreign languages improvement does not happen overnight. It requires time, hard work, and patience.

It’s also important to note that one of the primary factors in obtaining internships and full-time jobs in the US is extremely strong spoken English language skills. For those students whose English language skills aren’t strong, they often don’t fare well in the interview process. So, they find themselves without the types of opportunities that they’re really seeking.

Posted on June 15, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Students will often send us reports to give us an update on how they’re doing with their MBA applications and the GMAT. Today we thought we’d share some success stories from our students in Germany.

Hi Arthur,

Thank You for an outstanding GMAT prep course (I took the course in Frankfurt in November). Last Saturday I had my GMAT appointment and scored an unbelievable (at least for me) 760! Although it was a lot of work after the course (as you said) I’m pretty sure I could not have done this without your recommendations and hints.

Thanks again!

Regards,

Torsten Wolter

Hello Arthur,

I was in your GMAT prep course in Frankfurt on 08./09.11. and I wanted to thank you very much for your help in the preparation to the GMAT! I had my test this Monday and scored 740 / 97 perc. (Quant 47 / 79, Verbal 44 / 97). I definately learned a lot from the course and especially from your personal advices and tips.

Thanks,

Ravi Nath

Dear Manhattan Review,

I attended your GMAT weekend crash course in Frankfurt (2nd/3rd june). I am happy to report that I aced the GMAT with a scaled score of 760. The methodology you provided me with was essential to achieving my GMAT aim.

As you can easily imagine, I am now trying to figure out which business school I should apply to and how to write a good application for a top school. Maybe you could also give me some advice on application strategy, essay-writing and letters of recommendation.

I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Regards,

Mona Schommer

Posted on June 11, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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