About the GMAT Test

What is the GMAT Test?

The GMAT is a standardized test delivered in English. Unlike academic grades, which have varying significance based on each school's grading guidelines, the GMAT scores are based on the same standard for all test takers and they help business schools assess the qualification of an individual against a large pool of applicants with diverse personal and professional backgrounds.

GMAT scores play a significant role in admissions decisions since they are more recent than most academic transcripts of an applicant and they evaluate a person's integrated verbal, quantitative and writing skills. GMAT scores are also used in the process of awarding financial assistance to students. A good GMAT score can save you thousands of dollars in tuition.

The GMAT is a Computer Adaptive Test (CAT) and can be taken at any one of many test centers around the world 5 or 6 days a week. You may take the GMAT only once every 31 days and no more than five times within any 12-month period. The retest policy applies even if you cancel your score within that time period. All of your scores and cancellations within the last five years will be reported to the institutions you designate as score recipients.

The GMAT consists of four separately timed sections. Each of the first two sections consists of an analytical writing task, also known as Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA). The remaining two sections (Quantitative and Verbal) consist of multiple-choice questions delivered in a computer-adaptive format. Questions in these sections are dynamically selected as you take the test to stay commensurate with your ability level. Therefore, your test will be unique. Just one question is shown on the screen at a given time. It is impossible to skip a question or go back to a prior question. Each problem needs to be answered before the next question.