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MBA

Weeks after unveiling its first series of GMAT instructional videos on YouTube, Manhattan Review is rolling out a second series on MBA Admissions advice for business school applicants. The videos feature short lectures on how to set application goals to meet deadlines, how to prepare for interviews, and how to strategize effective recommendation letters. The videos are designed to be short enough for the viewer to catch a quick overview, while still being long enough to fully convey the basic concepts that all MBA applicants need.

The videos feature members of Manhattan Review’s MBA Admissions Consulting team. Each lecture focuses on a different aspect of MBA Admissions that stems from the consultant’s expertise. The videos educate YouTube viewers, while also giving them a chance to experience the content and substance of Manhattan Review MBA Admissions Consulting Services.

Manhattan Review offers a variety of admissions consulting services, from comprehensive elite school packages focusing on a single school to those addressing admissions for up to five different MBA programs. Also available are hourly admissions packages, as well as packages specific to essay/resume writing and interview preparation. “By viewing these free MBA Admission videos,” said Tracy Yun, CEO, “applicant can get an overview of the basics of MBA Admissions and get a sampling of our more in-depth consulting services.”

As the number of applicants to MBA programs has grown over recent years, more MBA hopefuls have turned to admissions consulting services in order to gain an edge. And with the recession affecting people’s budgets, applicants need to be sure of the quality of the admission consultation that they purchase. The new series of YouTube videos from Manhattan Review demonstrates the quality of its service for students in need of consultation on their MBA applications.

Listed below are some initial videos that comprise Manhattan Review’s ongoing MBA Admissions Advice Video Series.

  • Business School Application – Tips on Essay-Writing
  • Business School Application – Tips on Recommendation Letters
  • Business School Application – Tips on Resume Preparation
  • Business School Application – Tips on Interview Preparation & Explaining Candidacy
  • Tips on Overall Strategy & School Choice
  • Tips on Optimal Number of Schools to Apply For & Time Management
  • Why Use An MBA Admissions Consultant

Email admissions@manhattanreview.com to ask about the MBA Candidacy Evaluation.

There appears to be a drop in interest from overseas applicants to U.S. MBA programs, according to Kumar Anand of the Economic Times in an article titled: “Number of Applicants for Executive Management in Indian B-Schools Rises.”

Anand cites the example of Jorawar Singh, an Indian young professional seeking an MBA degree inside India and not the likes of Boston and Ohio B-Scools.  This is unusual for many Indian MBA applicants, as well as applicants from other countries, too, as U.S. schools are typically the most sought after in terms of admission.  Anand writes: “In all, 42% of the full-time MBA programs in the U.S. reported a decline in the number of foreign applicants.  Of these, as many as 70% reported the largest decrease in number of applications from India.”

Jorawar Singh, the young professional Anand cites, feels a one-year B-School in India will help him get a job after graduation in India, as opposed to going overseas and then returning to look for work.  Singh contributes, by saying: “Today, quite a few Indian B-Schools are offering quality executive management program at much cheaper cost.”  Anand adds to this, saying that a number of Indian MBA applicants favor Indian B-Schools over U.S. B-Schools because the quality of education is much higher in India than is used to be, not to mention the cheaper cost.

Dave Wilson, president and CEO of GMAC (Graduate Management Admission Council) claims:

“More Indians prefer Indian B-Schools over B-Schools in the U.S.  Of late, India has been offering world-class management education.  Less expensive quality education provided by Indian B-Schools remains a big draw for Indian students.   People are interested in pursuing MBAs from the geography where they could continue working, and India has emerged as a preferred destination for many.”

Curious to know the facts supporting these statements?  Anand claims that a total of 17,488 applications were submitted to Indian B-Schools in 2008.  That number is five times higher than seen in 2004, according to the GMAC.  At the moment, 24 Indian B-Schools accept GMAT scores for 53 programs.

Posted on December 21, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Recently Manhattan Review has had a number of raffle drawings in Germany. We are pleased to announce three of our recent raffle winners: Cordelia Neumetzger, Christian Mankiewitz, and Lena Haubold!

Cordelia Neumetzger entered our raffle at our MBA Gate event in Frankfurt. Christian Mankiewitz and Lena Haubold entered our raffle at the QS World MBA tour in Berlin and Munich. All three won a free in-person GMAT course! Included in the prize are the following benefits included in our course tuition:

  • Better Score Guarantee – Unlimited Classes, Online Library & Advice
  • Turbocharge Your GMAT Math/Verbal Study and Solutions Guides
  • Extensive Quant and Vocabulary Glossaries
  • Three on-line challenging Computer Adaptive Tests
  • After-class Home Study Guideline provided
  • Discount for Private Tutoring & MBA Admissions Services
  • Discounted Access to Online Recording Library for tailored study
  • US$200 Student Referral; US$1000 Corporate Account Referral (applicable only for paying students)
  • Double Your In-Person Class Hours with an Online Course at No Additional Cost (up to 56 Hours of Total Real-time Instruction Hours)

Thanks to everyone who entered our drawings!

Posted on December 4, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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According to a recent article in Business Week titled: “GMAT: The MBA Job Seeker’s Best Friend” – it appears that many schools are encouraging students to take the GMAT time and time again.  A very eye-opening article by Anne VanderMey, it seems the GMAT is not only important for MBA admittance, but also for job recruiting after graduation.

According to VanderMey, with companies being flooded with resumes due to the recent economic recession, it appears recruiters are using GMAT scores to weed out applicants.  This is unusual, as never before has the GMAT taken on such added weight, but it appears for some companies, your score could very well be the factor that gets you an actual interview.

Due to this, professors and career services directors are encouraging students to retake the GMAT time and time again thanks to the tough recruiting climate.  VanderMey profiles several schools that are taking this advice seriously and putting it into practice:

  • University of Texas’s McCombs School of Business: Stacey Rudnick, director of MBA services is advising recent admits with mediocre GMAT scores to consider retaking the test if they think they can score higher.
  • University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business: Mendoza sent a letter to its 2011 class reminding students of the importance of the GMAT when applying to prestigious firms.  The school has offered a four-day crash course for students who wish to retake the test.  Mendoza’s director of MBA career development claims: “We see a large number of consulting companies, some investment banks and a couple of corporations all looking at both GMAT and undergrad MBA GPAs.  These companies are looking for a sustained record of academic excellence.”
  • Thunderbird School of Global Management: Kip Harrel, president of the MBA Career Services Council, claims that students’ average GMAT score is a primary factor in deciding where companies choose to recruit.
  • Darden School of Business: Jack Oakes, director of career services, claims that he sometimes advises candidates with scores in the mid-600s to retake the test if they are looking to land top-shelf consulting or banking positions.
  • Goizueta Business School: Wendy Tsung, executive director of MBA career services, states: “Because the economy is so bad, and there’s so many people applying for positions, companies are looking for different ways to reduce the number of resumes that they go through.  Of the reasons to throw out an application – GPA, undergraduate institution, years of work experience – the GMAT is an ‘easy one.’”

As suspected, a person’s quantitative GMAT score does seem to be linked to salary while some GMAT scores appear to be linked to managerial status. However, VanderMey informs us that not every company considers GMAT scores to be important when considering new hires.  At the University of Connecticut’s School of Business, for example, the executive director was never even asked for GMAT scores from its student body.

It appears, however, that a high GMAT score simply helps you get your foot in the door for the actual interview.  A high score, in general, won’t get you the job of your dreams, but it will get you into speaking with someone face-to-face.  VanderMey quotes Mareza Larizadeh, the founder of Doostang, a career networking site popular with MBA students: “The GMAT isn’t going to get you in.  But it’s something that can prevent you from getting in the door.”

While it seems the GMAT is becoming important for more than just MBA admittance, VanderMey concludes (along with the above schools) that ultimately, the personal elements of the job search – interviews and references, primarily, will always be more important than test scores.

Posted on November 28, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Online degrees don’t have the stigma they once did. In fact, many universities are pouring money into their online degree programs because it’s such a practical option for so many people looking to go back to school. What’s not to like about it? It’s cheap. It’s convenient. But when you’re aiming for an MBA, how does it work? Does it differ at all from an “in-the-classroom” MBA?

Many students worry about two aspects of the online MBA: its accreditation system and whether or not their degree will specify they received an online degree as opposed to an in-person degree. In general, MBAs require 36 credits, usually divided into two years: one for generalized business study, the other for specialized study. The online MBA works no different. A slight alteration, however, is discussion in the classroom is replaced by forums and message boards through the Internet. In terms of your degree, most degrees don’t actually say where the degree was obtained. According to “OnlineMBADegrees.net,” the only way a potential employer would know you received an online degree was if you received it from a school that only functioned online.

Students also wonder if it takes longer to complete an online MBA versus that of an MBA at a university. Actually, students can finish their degrees in less than the two years it normally takes to do so in person since so much of the work you do in the online degree program is self-motivated.

Another major concern about the online MBA is whether it assists candidates in increasing their salaries like traditional MBAs are advertised to do. According to “elearners.com,” online MBA degree candidates hold all sorts of positions after graduation – including vice presidents and CEOs. The GMAC averaged in 2005 that all MBA graduates (online and off!) could expect to earn an average of $106,000.00. Wanting an even better bet?

What are some top schools to get an MBA from? Check out MacQuil and Onlinembaguide.

In summary: an online MBA is no less legitimate than an “in-person” MBA. Pursue the MBA program that’s right for you.

Posted on September 29, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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This week we’d like to share some emails we’ve received from students in the UK!

Hi Henry,

I did a weekend crash course with Manhattan Review in London, and found the rigorous practice we did in class very helpful in exposing each of our weaker points. Our tutor gave us lots of useful advice about techniques for tackling specific question types and noting common cognitive errors which would have been much more difficult to gather from studying alone. I also took some private tuition with the crash course tutor, who helped me with areas that I particularly needed to focus on. The tutor gave frank feedback about my weak areas whilst at the same time offering encouragement and showing a good sense of humour. The Manhattan team were also willing to accommodate my availability and quick to respond to requests. I got 720 in the GMAT – many thanks to Manhattan for all their support!

All the best,

Diana Carter

Hello Henry, or as people say around these parts, ‘Howdy’!,

I am e-mailing you in between marketing and accounting classes at the McCombs Business School (University of Texas at Austin), so you could definitely say that I have progressed in terms of my MBA plans!
I took the MR crash course with David Chambers as my instructor. I found David’s tuition to be first-class; and this definitely helped me get a good score first time (710, 5.5AWA) in the GMAT exam that I took about a month after the course.
I was accepted into the University of Texas on a Nippon Foundation Scholarship. I resigned from my job and I haven’t looked back since!

Regards,

Daniel Harrison

Posted on July 6, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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A new trend among MBA students (one which might surprise you) has emerged in recent years. Many future business leaders are voluntarily pledging to act responsibly and ethically, to uphold truth and integrity, and to view businesses as more than just money-making organizations.

Interest in ethics courses and student activities concerned with corporate responsibility has significantly grown. Students at Columbia formed a Leadership and Ethics Board that holds lectures about business and ethics. Ten years ago, Wharton had one ethics class that was required. Now, there are seven professors teaching several ethics course offerings that are popular among students. Wharton has also had the Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research since 1997.

Recent graduates are growing more concerned with corporate social responsibility. This is not to say that graduates will not be interested in high-paying jobs at big companies, but they’ll think about how they earn their income and how corporations impact the environment, the community, and their employees’ quality of life.

So who’s taking the pledge, and how? Here are examples of how students at two of the top business schools are promising to be ethical in business.

  • Around 20 percent of Harvard Business School’s graduating class have signed “The MBA Oath,” a voluntary pledge to act responsibly and ethically in business practices.
  • Students at Columbia Business School must pledge to an honor code that states: “As a lifelong member of the Columbia Business School community, I adhere to the principles of truth, integrity, and respect. I will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.”

Posted on June 29, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Obtaining Student Visas

Students are required by the US government to obtain a student visa prior to their arrival in the US. The waiting period for a visa interview at US embassies varies greatly according to country, but generally will take between 2 and 8 weeks. This requires advanced preparation on the part of the student. It is also important to keep in mind that students obtain a visa to attend a particular program at a particular school.  Consequently, when you do go to the embassy to apply for a visa you should have already made your study decision. Changing your decision later, for example, switching from Wharton to Harvard, requires another visa.

After attaining your visa, the US government permits international students to move to the country a month before their program begins. This is advantageous for international students because they are likely to need more time to get their bearings, make housing arrangements, and also take care of additional bureaucratic formalities.

Inquiring About H-1B Work Visas

Working in the US after completing an MBA requires attaining a work visa.  The most common of these for skilled workers is the H-1B visa. A limited number of these visas are awarded each year, and most international students find the process easiest with large corporations accustomed to bringing in non-Americans. This basically means that for those seeking to work in the US post-graduation, they need to begin their job search prior to graduating, keeping in mind that they should target companies that are willing to sponsor international students. Business school career centers will assist in this process by helping students determine which corporations are willing to take on responsibility to hire them.

Important Considerations

  • Consider your fit with the school in terms of teaching and learning style, the school’s location within the US, and whether you’ll be happy there.
  • Be aware of your post MBA goals, including the industry you prefer and the role you envision for yourself.
  • Research the costs and economic feasibility of your plans.

For non-native English speakers, prepare for education in English.

Posted on June 22, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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The United States is home to many of the world’s top MBA programs and has a vast array of schools and program choices. Many of its schools provide opportunities not only in the United States but also globally.  In addition, international students are welcome applicants in US schools. They contribute to student body diversity, bring professional experience from outside the US and, very importantly, provide different perspectives to students and faculty, broadening the horizons of all.

Though business schools in the United States traditionally offer 2-year full-time MBA programs, encouraging an internship between the first and second years, MBA programs in the US have expanded in recent years to include 1-year programs, distance learning programs and online, part-time MBA programs. In addition, some programs offer students the exciting opportunity to study in Asia, Europe and the United States. Plentiful options also exist for the experienced professional seeking Executive MBA training.

That said, international applicants sometimes find attending US schools to be tricky, requiring a lot of advanced preparation— especially in the post-September 11th and post-financial crisis environment.

Researching Schools

A great method to find out detailed information about American and European business schools is to attend different MBA tours, which hold forums all over the world to connect interested applicants with business school admissions staff.

Assessing Language Challenges

Some students may find that getting used to life in the US is challenging. Academic, language, or personal adjustments can be difficult, so be sure to give yourself a chance to adjust—for most of us, these things just take time.

Classroom time, for example, is packed with discussion, debate, projects, and student presentations.  International students will want to familiarize themselves with teaching styles prevalent in the US and be sure that they are comfortable with them, or at the least open to them before school begins.

In addition, for non-native English speakers who lack experience in English-speaking classrooms and professional environments, language difficulties may be an obstacle. As part of your b-school application, non-native English speakers will be required to take the TOEFL exam, an English proficiency test. This test requires study and rigorous preparation for many applicants. Score requirements vary according to school, but most schools do provide clear guidelines on what score is acceptable. After completing the TOEFL, the best way to meet the challenge of entering a program in English is to practice and prepare.

Take English as a Second Language classes, sometimes offered during the summer at particular business schools, or a Business English course, if a student’s vocabulary and business language is more problematic. However, keep in mind that with foreign languages improvement does not happen overnight. It requires time, hard work, and patience.

It’s also important to note that one of the primary factors in obtaining internships and full-time jobs in the US is extremely strong spoken English language skills. For those students whose English language skills aren’t strong, they often don’t fare well in the interview process. So, they find themselves without the types of opportunities that they’re really seeking.

Posted on June 15, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Students will often send us reports to give us an update on how they’re doing with their MBA applications and the GMAT. Today we thought we’d share some success stories from our students in Germany.

Hi Arthur,

Thank You for an outstanding GMAT prep course (I took the course in Frankfurt in November). Last Saturday I had my GMAT appointment and scored an unbelievable (at least for me) 760! Although it was a lot of work after the course (as you said) I’m pretty sure I could not have done this without your recommendations and hints.

Thanks again!

Regards,

Torsten Wolter

Hello Arthur,

I was in your GMAT prep course in Frankfurt on 08./09.11. and I wanted to thank you very much for your help in the preparation to the GMAT! I had my test this Monday and scored 740 / 97 perc. (Quant 47 / 79, Verbal 44 / 97). I definately learned a lot from the course and especially from your personal advices and tips.

Thanks,

Ravi Nath

Dear Manhattan Review,

I attended your GMAT weekend crash course in Frankfurt (2nd/3rd june). I am happy to report that I aced the GMAT with a scaled score of 760. The methodology you provided me with was essential to achieving my GMAT aim.

As you can easily imagine, I am now trying to figure out which business school I should apply to and how to write a good application for a top school. Maybe you could also give me some advice on application strategy, essay-writing and letters of recommendation.

I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Regards,

Mona Schommer

Posted on June 11, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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