Tag Archive

Math

Students will often send us reports to give us an update on how they’re doing with their MBA applications and the GMAT. We love hearing student success stories, so we thought we’d share some of these emails with you!

Hi

I was a student at Manhattan Review and I just wanted to let you guys know – I finally took the GMAT today and got a 720. I could’ve done better on the Math but I found it to be more difficult than I expected. I had to blindly guess on the last 3-4 questions. Made it up in Verbal though!

Q 45 V 44. Overall, I am pretty happy with the score. I want to thank Man. Rev. for the boost.

Keep in touch

– Iris Xu

Hi Henry,

I hope all is well with you. I completed your Manhattan Review course last month and took the gmat yesterday. I want to let you know that I really appreciated your enthusiasm as an instructor, and your gmat tips really helped! You’d asked that we let you know how we did, so here goes:
I scored a 720 (48 in quant and 40 in verbal).

Thanks for your help,
Lauren G.

Hi Tim,

I just wanted to say thank you to you and the instructors at manhattan review for helping me with my preparation for the GMATs. As you know, I did my GMAT last year and got a score that was less than what I had hoped for, but with your help and some improved study skills, I got a 750 on my test on Saturday afternoon.

I couldn’t have done it without your help,

Thanks again,
Priya Pandian

Posted on May 28, 2009 by Manhattan Review

This entry was posted in GMAT and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Your first year of business school is likely to be a busy one. Adjusting to a new place, meeting new people, learning new things, and opening new doors will make it an exciting, even thrilling experience. Yet, the best way to ensure that you will enjoy your first-year of business school is through preparedness. There are essentially three key ways in which to prepare, and thereby easily clear some of the main hurdles of the first-year.

1: Math Prep

Before you arrive on campus, you should focus on academic preparedness for the Math aspect of business school. If you feel a little weak on your quantitative skills prior to beginning your MBA, you are not alone. Approximately a third of MBA entrants need a full Math review course before they begin classes, and an additional third are weak in some area—whether accounting, statistics or excel spreadsheets—and need to spend some time working on it in the summer prior to beginning school. This does leave an additional third—these engineers, accountants or “traditional” candidates, who have been working in the finance industry prior to starting their study. If you fall into this category, you are unlikely to need much additional quantitative before your first-year classes begin. There are also diagnostic tests you may consider taking if you are uncertain of whether or not you are ready for MBA math.

Review Options

o Many business schools offer a math camp or quantitative review to students prior to entering the fall semester. Check with the school you will be attending to see what summer programs they offer. (It’s also a good networking opportunity.)

o GMAC sells a Quantitative review program called MBA Survival Kit, including 4 CDs covering finance, accounting, math and statistics skills. Each CD may be purchased separately. Available for $60 each or $155 for the complete set.

o MBA Math is an online math review course modeled on the Math Camp at Dartmouth University’s Tuck Business School. It’s available for $99.

Recommendations

o Seek out a program that is approved or recommended by the school you are going to attend. Many schools offer their own Math Camps during the summer.

o If you do fall into a category like “career-changer” (those out of practice in terms of quantitative skills), take a course. Not doing so will leave you in a position of having to catch up with your classmates, many of whom are accustomed to using analytical or quantitative skills daily. Not taking the time to review will make your first-year a much less pleasurable experience—academically, professionally, and socially.

Posted on January 5, 2009 by Manhattan Review

This entry was posted in MBA and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1.) Start from the VERY basics: memorize all the glossaries and formulae until they come to you as a second nature.

2.) Formulate a plan with dedicated math hours per day, per week, per topic and per test category.

3.) Practice with each separate and related math conceptual areas and sub-areas at ONE time. Do NOT move on to a less relevant topic until you achieve your targeted proficiency level.

4.) If you start at least 2 or 3 months before the scheduled exam, do NOT time yourself initially to dampen your own confidence. Rather, after solving a problem, compare your solution to the one in the book, stop for a moment and think about other approaches you could have taken or intermediate steps you could have avoided to get to the same answer choice.

5.) Write down the type of mistakes you have made while practicing. Scan through the list of your common errors each time before you start to practice a series of problems to reinforce the correct approach in your mind.

6.) Start with Problem Solving first to build or rebuild a solid math foundation. Master it. Then go on to Data Sufficiency.

7.) When in Data Sufficiency, ask yourself “Is the answer definitive with ONLY one result?” If yes, then ask yourself “Which condition or combination of the conditions will lead to this ONE result. Do not get yourself confused with the question “Can this problem be solved based on the conditions given?” Often times, the answer can be derived based on the conditions; however, multiple answers can be derived, not the single result the Data Sufficiency question is typically asking for.

8.) After you studied all the conceptual topics and finished a good number of practice problems related to those topics, then start to time yourself and try to finish 37 questions within 75 minutes WITHOUT a break. If you are doing well, try to finish 40 questions within 75 minutes WITHOUT a break. Continue to increase number of questions you work with in the same time span.

9.) So you are ready now. Take a mock computer adaptive test and focus on math only. Take another one.

10.) Take an entire mock computer adaptive test with the scheduled breaks just as on the real test.

11.) Practice, practice, practice! Consult with expert instructors when you need help!

12.) You will achieve your targeted math score!

Additional Tips:

*Be aware of the relative weight the GMAT places on topics. Number properties and algebra come up again and again–master these topics before spending time on less commonly tested areas such as probability.

*Train yourself to avoid unnecessary calculations, particularly on Data Sufficiency. Remember that it is enough to know that a solution can be derived, whether or not you know the actual solution.

Posted on November 3, 2007 by Manhattan Review

This entry was posted in GMAT and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.