Tag Archive

GMAT prep

General Information

  • It’s a 4-hour Computer Adaptive Test (CAT) that can be taken at any one of many test centers around the world 5 or 6 days a week.
  • You may take the GMAT only once every 31 days and no more than five times within any 12-month period.
  • This policy applies even if you cancel your score within that time period, and all of your scores and cancellations within the last five years will be reported to the institutions you designate as score recipients.
Analytical Writing Assessment
  •  It’s made up of three sections, the first being the Analytical Writing Assessment, or AWA.
  • The good news is that there are only two questions in this section, the bad news is that they’re both essays.
  • One question asks you to analyze an issue, the other asks that you analyze an argument.
  • You are given thirty minutes to answer each question.
  • Your score on this question will range anywhere from a 0 to 6 (in increments of .5), and this section won’t have any affect on any other GMAT score.
Math Section
  • After finishing the AWA, the next section you’ll encounter will be the Math section.
  • There are 37 questions in this section, and about four of them will be trial questions which won’t count towards your actual score.
  • You’ll have seventy-five minutes to answer an assortment of Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency questions.
  • Your score will range anywhere from 0-60, with a mean score of 35/45th percentile.
Verbal Section
  • When you’re done with the Math section, you’re going to move into the last section: Verbal.
  • There are 41 questions in this section, and just like with the Math section, you’ll be given 75 minutes to answer all of them and four questions will be trial questions that won’t be counted towards your actual score.
  • There are three different kinds of question in this section: Critical Reasoning, Sentence Correction, and Reading Comprehension.
  • Your possible score will range anywhere from 0-60, with a mean score of about 27.3/46%.
  • In total, you’ll be given four hours to complete the GMAT and your overall score will range anywhere from 200-800.

Posted on September 29, 2011 by Manhattan Review

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In face of the increased competition from GRE, administered by the ETS, and the changes in admissions processes preferred by business school worldwide, Graduate Management Admissions Council (GMAC) has decided to add a new section, Integrated Reasoning, to its challenging Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).  This new section of the exam is designed to test advanced reasoning skills and is separately scored from the total 800 score of verbal and quantitative sections. It is to launch in the 10th edition of the GMAT on June 4, 2012, less than two years away from now.

In spring 2010, GMAC piloted the new section with current MBA students and plans to pilot it again with thousands of students this fall.

GMAC states: “The new section will replace one of the two writing sections currently on the exam.  It will be scored separately and have a new audio component for some questions.  The test’s current verbal and math sections will remain unchanged.”  The new changes in the exam are the following:

  • Test takers will need to interpret charts, graphs, and spreadsheets, and answer interactive questions that will test their analytical skills.
  • Test takers will be asked to analyze information, draw out conclusions and determine relationships between data points.
  • Test takers will wear headphones while taking this portion of the test.  The use of headphones is a new feature that will help schools assess students’ auditory learning style.
  • Rather than just multiple-choice questions, test takers will drag-and-drop data points, as well, as write mini-essays.

GMAC has released a sample question similar to questions that will appear on the new test. Students are asked to look at a table that sorts like a spreadsheet and detail the number of passengers and airline movements at 21 airports around the world. They are then presented with a list of statements about the information in the table and asked to determine which of the statements are true based on the data in the spreadsheet. Other exercises include using the same table to evaluate the reason for or likelihood of certain outcomes, or to use the table to determine where other airports rank.  Some other possible questions may be to determine a country’s plans for a road.  This would include looking at maps and government data.

Below is a sample question with the data tables and charts test takers will see in the new version of the GMAT. To view the data table and graph click on the link below!

Sample Question Data Table/Graph

1. Of the models with Gasoline Engine Type, the model with the greatest ratio of City MPG to Highway MPG is also the model with the greatest difference between Highway MPG and City MPG.


2. The minimum City MPG for a Toyota make is less than the maximum City MPG for a Volkswagen make.


3. A model chosen at random from those models with a Highway MPG greater than 30 miles per gallon has a 50% chance of being a Toyota.


4. The median carbon footprint for all models is greater than the mode carbon footprint for all models.


5. The standard deviation of the Highway MPG values for all BMW models is lower than the standard deviation of the Highway MPG values for all Toyota models.

Integrated Reasoning Answers: Statements 1 and 4 are FALSE; Statements 2, 3, and 5 are TRUE.

Why the new changes?  These changes are due to the evolving trends seen in business school classrooms.  This is a way to distinguish between those students who will adapt well in the classroom rather than just score a high score on the GMAT, making it easier for business schools to select who to be admitted. This new change is welcomed with great enthusiasm by business schools. GMAC created the section after b-school faculty members expressed a preference for proof that students could read, synthesize and reason well from a set of data within a limited amount of time without relevant in-depth knowledge and any memorization.

The addition of 30-minute Integrated Reasoning in replacement of one of the Analytical Writing Assessment sections is the biggest change to GMAT since it became a computer-adaptive test in the late 1990s. Other recent year changes occurred in 2006 after the switch over of the test administration from the ETS to Pearson. However those changes are more in rules and format, less in content.

Some students may fear that with this new section added to the GMAT, their score may not be as high than with the old exam.  Fear not.  GMAC is planning outreach and educational programs for business school faculty and students.  These programs will include information sessions and details on the new tests.

To get a better sense on the new integrated reasoning section click on the title below:

 Next Generation GMAT Question Demonstration

We at Manhattan Review wholeheartedly support such a constructive change on the GMAT and are prepared to incorporate the teaching of the new section into our curriculum. We strongly feel that without changing the existing verbal and math questions and one of the writing sections, the new Integrated Reasoning section will make the test much improved and effective while minimizing implementation costs. A win-win solution for all parties involved! However, this new section does seem to put more emphasis on extensive data analysis, which might be a challenge for students who are not used to seeing a large amount of data in a spreadsheet format. 

Posted on June 28, 2010 by Manhattan Review

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We would like to share with you an exciting new promotional offer for our GMAT students – All students who sign up for a full course of 16 hours or more will be entitled to Unlimited Class Access. A saved value of over US$1000!

What is the offer?

1) You can join any available sessions of a comparable in-person course or an online GMAT course within 60 days of the last day of your course.

2) In addition, you will receive free access to our popular 100+ hours of GMAT online recording library.

(Please note that this offer may not be applicable to certain regions.)

How will it help you achieve a higher score?

  • Allows you to extend your study period with the guidance of an instructor for an additional 60 days after you take a course with us
  • Provides you with the opportunity to prepare your own questions after substantial self-study to bring them to the classroom and consult with instructors in real-time
  • Reinforces your learning through repeated but progressive instructions
  • Allows you to focus on various areas of strengths and weaknesses over an extended period with expert guidance
  • Solidifies your knowledge by studying with two or more of our top instructors, each with years of teaching experience and consistent student acclaim. Get to know some of our star GMAT teachers:

John Beer has taught English composition and literature to undergraduates for over eight years.  His writing has appeared in numerous periodicals, including the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Review, Review of Contemporary Fiction, Time Out Chicago, and the Village Voice.  He is a Ph.D. candidate in philosophy and social thought at the University of Chicago and holds an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and a BA from Princeton.  John also takes the GMAT on a periodic basis to stay abreast of the latest GMAT changes. He consistently scored 780’s on the GMAT.

David Chambers is the director of a Singapore-based small-cap equities fund and the founder/director of an engineering software company that won a UK government “SMART” development grant. He holds three masters degrees: an MBA from London Business School, an MSc in Chemical Engineering from the University of Cambridge, and an LLM in Intellectual Property Law from the University of London. He has also studied at Keio Business School in Tokyo and spent extended periods living and working in the USA. His commercial experience encompasses corporate finance, strategy, engineering, software development, and sales, in a variety of international environments. He scored 760 on the GMAT (99th percentile) and is a highly experienced instructor.

How does it work?

Check out our Unlimited Class Access or email us at info@manhattanreview.com for more details!

Posted on February 8, 2010 by Manhattan Review

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Manhattan Review GMAT Prep is into its eleventh year of helping students achieve high GMAT scores and get into top MBA programs. Now, more than ever, GMAT score is essential to the strength of a business school application. With an MBA degree from top schools becoming ever more in demand, and thus the MBA application processes becoming ever more competitive, students are always looking for a way to make their application stand out. A high GMAT score is instrumental for any student who wishes to be accepted to a top MBA program. With a decade of experience, more than any other comparable GMAT prep company, Manhattan Review is continuing to educate students on how to get the top scores necessary to get into the top schools.

The story of Manhattan Review began in an Ivy-League MBA classroom in summer 1999. Dr. Joern Meissner, while teaching at Columbia Business School, heard from his students that they and their friends were frustrated with conventional GMAT preparation options. In response, he started to create original lectures that focused on presenting the GMAT content in a coherent and concise manner. Dr. Meissner then shared his new approach with students preparing for the GMAT, and it proved immediately popular. Based on these methods, the company Manhattan Review was created with the purpose of providing higher quality GMAT preparation.

Throughout Manhattan Review’s history, the GMAT has changed in many ways. Since the development of those original lectures, the team at Manhattan Review has expanded and adapted its teaching methods to reflect the changes in the test. Students who are retaking the GMAT after a few years need to be aware of the ways in which the test differs from when they originally took it. And any student preparing to take the GMAT needs up-to-date information on the test and the ways it has been modified.

“Over the last ten years,” said Manhattan Review’s founder, Dr. Joern Meissner, “we’ve seen the GMAT becomes more important to the MBA admissions process. We’re proud of the work we’ve done, and we look forward to providing help to students in need of GMAT preparation for many years to come.” She added, “This milestone of being a premier GMAT provider for a decade gives us a chance to reflect on the current landscape of highly selective programs.”

Meantime, students are increasingly seeking the knowledge and support offered by Manhattan Review MBA admissions consultants to gain acceptance into the top business schools around the world. A combination of former admissions committee member experience, insightful advice and customized service distinguishes Manhattan Review’s admissions consulting services. Manhattan Review’s various MBA admissions consulting services are designed to cater to the needs of GMAT students seeking an additional edge in the MBA application and admissions process.

Posted on January 23, 2010 by Manhattan Review

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Manhattan Review has responded to the ongoing recession by lowering the price of its Multi-Week Long GMAT Courses held in New York and Live Online.  For a limited time in 2010 starting from January 16th, a discount is being extended to students who join the Manhattan Review New York GMAT Long Courses and Online Live GMAT Courses. Normally priced at $1399, the New York GMAT Long Courses are now available for $1099. Normally priced at $1025, the Live Online GMAT Courses are now available for $899.

“We understand that current economic conditions have put a strain on the budget of many students,” said Dr. Joern Meissner, the founder and academic director. “But Manhattan Review is committed to preparing students for the GMAT and helping them reach their target score.”

If students pay two weeks in advance for the New York GMAT Long Courses, they are also eligible for an early-bird discount of $999 for a full 28-hour in-person course. The students will also have the option to reinforce their learning with a different instructor in a live online course, bringing the total hours of instruction to 56 hours or more.

Students not located in the New York City area should also check out Manhattan Review’s new discounted price for its Interactive Online GMAT Courses. Normally priced at $1025, the Live Online GMAT Long Courses are now available for $899. If students pay two weeks in advance for Online GMAT courses, they are also eligible for an early-bird promotional discount of $845. It also comes with unlimited access to Manhattan Review’s popular online live recording library of over 100 hours, bringing the total hours of instruction to 128 hours.

Though the price of the course has been lowered by as much as 30%, the Manhattan Review GMAT course content remains unchanged. Students will still receive four Manhattan Review Turbocharge Your GMAT study Guides, as well as the three GMAT Official Guides. Purchase of the course also includes five online full-length Computer Adaptive Tests that simulate the GMAT on a home computer and help students gauge how their score is coming along as they progress through the course.

All Manhattan Review GMAT courses include the following services:

*Better Score Guarantee: Unlimited class hours and advice*
*Double Class for 56+ hours; US$200 Student Referral*
1-2 dedicated GMAT Math and GMAT Verbal instructors for the entire course
Full set proprietary GMAT course materials (Turbocharge Your GMAT)
Real Official Guide GMAT questions (3 books included)
Five on-line challenging GMAT practice tests (CATs)
After-class GMAT Home Study Guideline, Email Support, BlogForum
8-Hour MBA Admissions Online Boot Camp
Student Discount for GMAT TutoringMBA Admissions Help

Find out more – Syllabi, Schedule, Venues, Teaching Video!


Posted on January 16, 2010 by Manhattan Review

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This week we’d like to share some emails we’ve received from students in the UK!

Hi Henry,

I did a weekend crash course with Manhattan Review in London, and found the rigorous practice we did in class very helpful in exposing each of our weaker points. Our tutor gave us lots of useful advice about techniques for tackling specific question types and noting common cognitive errors which would have been much more difficult to gather from studying alone. I also took some private tuition with the crash course tutor, who helped me with areas that I particularly needed to focus on. The tutor gave frank feedback about my weak areas whilst at the same time offering encouragement and showing a good sense of humour. The Manhattan team were also willing to accommodate my availability and quick to respond to requests. I got 720 in the GMAT – many thanks to Manhattan for all their support!

All the best,

Diana Carter

Hello Henry, or as people say around these parts, ‘Howdy’!,

I am e-mailing you in between marketing and accounting classes at the McCombs Business School (University of Texas at Austin), so you could definitely say that I have progressed in terms of my MBA plans!
I took the MR crash course with David Chambers as my instructor. I found David’s tuition to be first-class; and this definitely helped me get a good score first time (710, 5.5AWA) in the GMAT exam that I took about a month after the course.
I was accepted into the University of Texas on a Nippon Foundation Scholarship. I resigned from my job and I haven’t looked back since!

Regards,

Daniel Harrison

Posted on July 6, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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Students will often send us reports to give us an update on how they’re doing with their MBA applications and the GMAT. Today we thought we’d share some success stories from our students in Germany.

Hi Arthur,

Thank You for an outstanding GMAT prep course (I took the course in Frankfurt in November). Last Saturday I had my GMAT appointment and scored an unbelievable (at least for me) 760! Although it was a lot of work after the course (as you said) I’m pretty sure I could not have done this without your recommendations and hints.

Thanks again!

Regards,

Torsten Wolter

Hello Arthur,

I was in your GMAT prep course in Frankfurt on 08./09.11. and I wanted to thank you very much for your help in the preparation to the GMAT! I had my test this Monday and scored 740 / 97 perc. (Quant 47 / 79, Verbal 44 / 97). I definately learned a lot from the course and especially from your personal advices and tips.

Thanks,

Ravi Nath

Dear Manhattan Review,

I attended your GMAT weekend crash course in Frankfurt (2nd/3rd june). I am happy to report that I aced the GMAT with a scaled score of 760. The methodology you provided me with was essential to achieving my GMAT aim.

As you can easily imagine, I am now trying to figure out which business school I should apply to and how to write a good application for a top school. Maybe you could also give me some advice on application strategy, essay-writing and letters of recommendation.

I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Regards,

Mona Schommer

Posted on June 11, 2009 by Manhattan Review

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October has arrived. If you are considering applying for an MBA program in the fall of 2009, now is a good time to begin the process. It’s certainly not too late. You’ll still be likely to be ready to apply in rounds 1 or 2, which offer a pretty good chance of acceptance.

Order of Attack

1. GMAT PREPARATION

Preparation can last anywhere from 1-6 months, but 2 months usually is an adequate prep period. Though study can be done individually, taking a course or seeking out private tutoring provides disciplined structure and guidance for your study.

2. GMAT

Take the GMAT as soon as you feel ready. If you take it by end of October, you should have the needed time to retake the GMAT (including an additional 1 month prep) if your score is not what you desired.

3. RESEARCH SCHOOLS

During preparation, look into different MBA programs. Look at them from as many angles as possible, including ranking, conversations with current students and alumni, correspondence with admissions officers and visits to campuses. Ultimately, select a range of schools you’d like to apply to. The most important criteria to use in determining where to apply is: What places are best suited to your personality, professional and academic history and goals? There are a variety of recommendations as to how many schools to apply to. Some say as few as 3, others as many as 8 or 10. Ultimately, you want to have some options, so lean toward more rather than less, and be sure to include safety schools. You may consider seeking advise from an admissions consultant to determine where it might be best to apply.

4. RECOMMENDATIONS

Ask for recommendations as early as possible, giving each recommender ample time to complete the forms on time.

5. APPROACH APPLICATIONS

The entire process and especially the application involve a great deal of self-evaluation. In this stage it will be most important that you recognize your strengths and weaknesses, and determine how you will express these in your applications. This will also be important in your interview. It is generally recommended that the application show your true self. There is no need to conceal mistakes; the incorporation of constructive explanations for faults, mistakes, or minuses will allow the admissions committee to develop a clear perception of who you really are. Admissions officers especially dislike fakeness and falsehood in applications.

Essays too require evaluation and most importantly they require time, time not only to write, but time to think as well. It is recommended that you spend between 50 and 100 hours on your essays, depending on the number of schools you apply to. Admissions advisors recommend that you devote your energy in particular to making sure each application explains why you want to attend particular programs.

6. INTERVIEW (Should occur as early as possible)

Interviews require preparation. Reviewing your application and practicing interviewing skills with a friend or co-worker is useful. Also, some individuals try to interview as early as possible at a local school and use this interview to test their skills, as well as to inform themselves of answers or approaches that seem to work, and those that do not. And, as your parents or friends have said to you time and again, be yourself and relax.

Posted on October 16, 2008 by Manhattan Review

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