Category TOEFL

All posts about TOEFL.

Posted on May 18, 2015 | Filed in TOEFL

Top 4 Ways to Master English for the TOEFL

Learn what 4 ways thrive best to master english for TOEFL exam.

Many wishing to master English as a foreign language are curious as to the best methods available. The key to mastering a language is to live as if you already have complete fluency. Immerse yourself in the culture of the language and those who speak it. The goal with learning a language is to be able to express yourself fully and understand the thoughts and attitudes of those around you. Your aim is to understand the language both conversationally and formally. Learning a language and living a language …

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Posted on January 14, 2015 | Filed in TOEFL

How to Use Communication Skills to Master the TOEFL Exam

Learn how paying attention to how you speak in your native language can help you master the TOEFL exam. Communication is about conveying a message and mastering the use of words and phrases is what the TOEFL aims to assess.

The TOEFL exam is meant to assess your mastery of English as a foreign language. Fluency is defined as being able to communicate in a language with relative ease. You are only as fluent in a language as you are able to easily convey messages, ideas, thoughts, using grammatically correct words and phrases. The best way to practice this skill …

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Posted on October 28, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

General Information

  • It is made up of Reading, Listening, Speaking, and Writing sections.
  • It will take you about four hours in total from start to finish.
  • For the Speaking section, you speak into a microphone and your responses are digitally recorded and sent to the ETS Online Scoring Network.
  • For the Writing section, you will type your responses, which are sent to the ETS Online Scoring Network.
  • Human raters, trained and certified by ETS, rate the Speaking and Writing responses.
  • The test is not is not computer adaptive.
  • You can take notes throughout the whole test.

Grammar

  • There is no

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Posted on October 25, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

If in-person or online TOEFL tutoring through Manhattan Review is not a possibility for you, study guides for this exam are critical.  Many students often are confused as to what medium to pursue in regards to a TOEFL study guide: textbook, audio CDs, Internet practice program or computer-based practice tests and quizzes.

It’s highly recommended that you get some practice with this exam on a computer, since most of you will be taking the iBt version, which is solely computer-based.  After all, reading an academic article on a monitor is a very different experience from reading on regular paper.  Often …

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Posted on October 18, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

While the speaking section appears to cause a lot of worry in many students looking to take the TOEFL, it’s best understood when able to tackle the section on a question-by-question basis.  This article is going to explore TOEFL Speaking Question #5.  Here’s what we know about this question:

  • it involves a conversation between a male and female
  • it does not have a reading component
  • you have 20 seconds to prepare; 60 seconds to respond
  • your opinion is required at the end of the response

Here are some tips to help you get the high score of a 4 on …

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Posted on October 11, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

As with all tips for the TOEFL writing section, it’s important to keep in mind that while minor errors are acceptable, the frequency of minor errors, particularly combined with larger grammatical problems will undoubtedly detract from your overall score.

In particular, ESL students generally have problems with count and noncount nouns, primarily because such nouns vary from one language to the next. A primary way of getting this grammar down is memorizing most common noncount nouns. Here is a quick 101 on count and noncount nouns to refresh your memory for test day:

COUNT NOUNS:

Basically count nouns are nouns …

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Posted on October 4, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

Transitional words are crucial for a high score on the TOEFL writing section because raters are looking for smooth transitions from idea to idea and from paragraph to paragraph.  Not only do transitional words help papers read more smoothly, they also provide organization and understandability, not to mention improve the connections and transitions between thoughts on the speaking section!

Think of transitional words as divided into categories.  Here are several categories that will help you with both the integrated writing and independent writing.

Addition: also, again, as well as, besides, furthermore, in addition, moreover

Consequence: accordingly, as a result, …

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Posted on September 26, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

Similar to count and noncount nouns, definite and indefinite articles can be a trouble spot for ESL learners.  Rules vary from one language to another in regards to the usage of the definite versus indefinite, so some earnest practice with its rules in English would be of great advantage for the TOEFL exam.

In general, when speakers and writers do not have a specific person, place, or thing in mind, the corresponding nouns are known as non-specific and are often preceded with the indefinite article: “a” or “an” in the singular.  Often times, too, a noun is definite when a speaker …

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Posted on September 22, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

The adjective clause is an important aspect of grammar to keep in mind on the TOEFL writing portion.  Unlike the adverbial clause, which is mostly used on the integrated essay for compare/contrast, the adjective clause can be found in both the integrated and independent writing sections.  What do adjective clauses do and when is it important to use them? (Please note: Adjective clauses can also be referred to as adjectival or relative clauses.)

An adjective clause will contain the following:

  • a subject and a verb
  • a relative pronoun: who, whom, whose, that or which OR
  • a relative adverb: when, where

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Posted on September 20, 2011 | Filed in TOEFL

The adjective clause is an important aspect of grammar to keep in mind on the TOEFL writing portion.  Unlike the adverbial clause, which is mostly used on the integrated essay for compare/contrast, the adjective clause can be found in both the integrated and independent writing sections.  What do adjective clauses do and when is it important to use them? (Please note: Adjective clauses can also be referred to as adjectival or relative clauses.)

An adjective clause will contain the following:

  • a subject and a verb
  • a relative pronoun: who, whom, whose, that or which OR
  • a relative adverb: when, where or

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